Education: We need a national strategy – by @MeetaSengupta

@Meeta Sengupta in LiveMint talks about the need for a national strategy for education. There are various problems at various levels with our education system. Here are her suggestions on what the government needs to do to improve things:

  • Unbox Learning: […] Build on existing programmes to push content via multiple channels, create open libraries, let village school buildings become community learning centres after school time with open access to solar-powered connected computers. Commission science and reading vans, convert bus stops into educational game corners. Invest in creativity and research attitudes from the very beginning. Let learning be open to all, not just those who wear uniforms.
  • Unbind the education sector from these regulatory constraints, allow the private sector to participate and compete, and take on the role of good governance via agencies to ensure relentless focus on improving quality.
  • Build synergies between ministries. Let the digital literacy mission be integrated with the teachers’ mission. Vocational training and employability are inextricably linked with the labour ministry. Untangle the threads that do not allow student finance to flow freely, whether as loans, scholarships or vouchers.
  • The Bharatiya Janata Party’s manifesto and speeches spoke of maximum governance, minimum government. This is what education needs. Let the government provide oversight, not necessarily run operations

Read the full article where she goes into much more detail.

One thought on “Education: We need a national strategy – by @MeetaSengupta”

    1. Hello, the reform item no. 2 states, ‘Unbind the education sector from these regulatory constraints, allow the private sector to participate and compete, and take on the role of good governance via agencies to ensure relentless focus on improving quality.’

      The fact of the matter is that there are hardly any regulatory constraints on private players in the education sector. these private players have been clothing third rate educational programmes with third rate teaching infrastructure clothed in pretty looking buildings and high flying brochures. It has no tenured teachers who have any stake in the future of their students and run abysmally fourth-rate research programmes just to show that they can spell the word, ‘research’ but nothing beyond. there is Bharati in Pune, now ranked in forties, that sells its medical degrees, hires temporary faculty, then there is Amity in the north that advertises great research and patents where it has none of these attributes worth mentioning. I think the time has come to unleash funds and infrastructure for government-financed educational system by giving the teachers adequate incentives and funds for merit-based research and innovation.
      Tomtoming for private universities will not yield any results as these fat cats are out to increase their capital base and intellectual property.

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